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The species Mycoplasma are unique prokaryotes as they lack cell walls, meaning they do not Gram stain and they are not susceptible to beta-lactams. Mycoplasma genitalium is a parasitic bacterium which lives on and around the ciliated epithelial cells of genital and respiratory tracts and is the smallest free living bacterium which has been discovered. It was isolated in 1980 from urethral specimens. It is also considered to have the smallest genome. Mycoplasma genitalium is an STI and can be transmitted by unprotected sexual contact, however if diagnosed it may be treated with antibiotics.

This STI is often asymptomatic and in this way it is similar to Chlamydia and Gonorrhoea. Mycoplasma genitalium is often a secondary infection in that it persists in association with others in both sexes, and this infection is very difficult to be diagnosed alone.

Symptoms are different in both sexes experiencing Mycoplasma Genitalium. Male most commonly suffer from an inflamed urethra which causes burning, discharges and painful urination. Other most common symptoms for male are arthritis and reactive arthritis.

In women Mycoplasma genitalium is thought to be one of the causes of bacterial vaginosis, cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease and endometritis. This prokaryote has also been isolated from women who have given birth to premature babies.


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Symptoms exhibited in males and females:


Symptom
Female
Male
Urethritis
X
Y
Burning while urinating
Y
Y
Discharge
Y
Y
Vaginal itching
Y
X
Arthritis
X
Y
Pain during intercourse
Y
X


TREATMENT:

Centers for disease control recommends the use of one of the following antibiotics; Azithromycin, Doxycycline, Erythromycin, Erythromycin ethylsuccinate, Ofloxacin, or Levofloxacin to be taken for at-least 7-days in order to clear infection.